Schnauzer Miniature

The Schnauzer Miniature is a small dog with a big personality. Sturdy and muscular they stand with a regal bearing about them that just can't be ignored. Their feathering on the chest, legs and tail, along with their bearded and long-eye browed face make them distinctive in their appearance. They can have either a wiry or soft coat, floppy or pointed ears, but always have dark brown eyes with black rims that can make their owners hearts just melt!

Other Names
Zwergschnauzer
Country of Origin
Germany
Colour
Comes in salt and pepper, a grey and white, black and silver, solid black and there are some entirely white Minis though these are not often shown.
Size
Small
Height / Weight
Height 35cms at the withers and weigh 8kgs. Bitches 33cms and weigh 7kgs.
Health
Schnauzer Miniatures have some problems you should be wary of. Breeders are trying to manage them through screening and responsible breeding but you should still keep an eye out for skin issues like dermatitis, as well as pancreatitis and other fatty tumours.
Life Span
12-14 years
Intelligence
The Schnauzer Miniature is an intelligent dog, who likes to challenge you to get its own way. They like to please, and respond well to reward based training though can become bored if it becomes too repetitive. The Schnauzer Miniature is happy to spend some time alone, but should have something to keep them occupied. You will need to be firm and consistent to counter their headstrong natures.
Exercise
Low
Suitability (Children)
Medium
Feeding

The Schnauzer Miniature can be greedy so you should keep and eye on their feeding to make sure they do not become overweight. They don't tend to be fussy eaters and will be happy with wet or dry food. Be careful with overly fatty foods as this puts your dog at risk of pancreatitis.

Feeding Cost
$5-$10 p/w
Other Cost
Some professional grooming costs.
Excercise
The Schnauzer Miniature is a lively dog who love to play and fit in with their family's lifestyle. A walk a day is sufficient but they'll happily have more if it's on offer. The wool coated Schnauzer should not be walked in the middle of the day as it is at risk of overheating, especially in the solid black colouring.
Ailments
Schnauzer Miniatures have some problems you should be wary of. Breeders are trying to manage them through screening and responsible breeding but you should still keep an eye out for skin issues like dermatitis, as well as pancreatitis and other fatty tumours.
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

The Mini can either have a wire-haired coat or a wool coat. In both cases you will need to groom them at least twice a week, especially on the feathers of the legs, tail, chest and beard which can become matted and cause discomfort for your dog. For showing you will need to hand-strip but otherwise it's straightforward to clip them at home or to send them to the groomers. The colour of your Schnauzer Miniature will likely fade over time.

Grooming Frequency
More than once a week
Trimming
Occasional
A dog resembling a Schnauzer has been seen in art and sculpture since the 1400s. The Miniature appears to come have come about through a mix of the Standard sized Schnauzer and the Affenpinscher and other small dogs. The breed was first called the Schnauzer in 1879, the Miniature became a separate breed in Germany in 1899 and subsequently in America in 1925.


comments powered by Disqus