Chinese Crested

This breed features two varieties: one only has hair on its feet, tail and head while the other has a long coat and is referred to as the Powder Puff. They are very intuitive and are essentially made for cuddles. The Chinese Crested is eternally devoted to their owner.

 

Other Names
Chinese Crested, Powder Puff
Country of Origin
Africa
Colour
The Powder Puff features many different coat colours including blue, lavender, mahogany, copper while the Hairless is normally pink or black.
Size
Small
Height / Weight
This breed typically measures 23 – 33cms and weighs 3 – 5.5kgs.
Health
This breed is prone to Hip Dysplasia, Elbow Dysplasia, Hypothyroidism, dental issues and eye problems. The Chinese Crested has been known to be allergic to lanolin and wool.
Life Span
10 – 12 years
Intelligence
These pooches are easy to train and very alert.
Exercise
Medium
Suitability (Children)
Medium
Feeding

This breed has a big appetite despite its size and care should be taken not to overfeed it. They can generally follow a normal dog diet.

Feeding Cost
Up to $5 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
Although pint sized, the Chinese Crested has plenty of energy and requires a daily walk.
Ailments
This breed is prone to Hip Dysplasia, Elbow Dysplasia, Hypothyroidism, dental issues and eye problems. The Chinese Crested has been known to be allergic to lanolin and wool.
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

Both variations of the Chinese Crested require regular baths. The Powder Puff needs daily brushing to prevent matting. The use of lotions has been popular to maintain the skin of the Hairless Chinese Crested but this should be discussed with your vet before using any sort of cream on your dog's skin.

 

Grooming Frequency
Everyday
Trimming
None
Originally from Africa, the Chinese Crested was previously named African Hairless Terriers. The ancient Aztecs were rumoured to have slept next to this breed to keep their beds warm! Chinese trade ships loved this breed for its hunting abilities on their vessels. The American Kennel Club recognised the Chinese Crested Dog in 1991.


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