How to massage your dog

Don’t let their sweet faces and boundless energy fool you – dogs get stressed! And just like people, one way to de-stress your pooch is to give them a relaxing dog massage. No, really!

18 May 2017 By Kat Pekin Comments

There are many health benefits to massaging your dog aside from relaxation. Massaging your dog can help improve blood circulation, improve flexibility, reduce muscle tension and increase movement in your pup’s joints.

How to massage your dog

First things first, find a quiet space to massage your dog. Think of what you would like if you were getting a massage. Once you have your quiet place, bring your dog into the room and set them down on the floor or on a comfortable couch that they enjoy. Depending on your dog’s preferences, you might also like to grab their favourite blanket or a soft towel for them to lie on. Not only does this help to relax your four-legged pal, it can help to minimise the spread of dog hair.

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Start your massage with the dog's head, gently rubbing and scratching behind the ears. This will help calm your pup down. Once your dog is relaxed and sleepy, then you can start massaging your dog’s body. Move down from the head and massage as you pat your dog. Press gently with your palm, not too hard, and make circular motions across your dog’s fur. Use about the same amount of pressure you would use to click your computer mouse, and listen to make sure your dog doesn’t make a pained noise.

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When you come to a joint or muscle, be sure not to massage too hard as you might actually hurt your pet instead of relaxing him or her. Slowly extend the legs out one at a time and softly work the muscle. When massaging a pet, it’s always best to air on the side of caution and massage lightly since our pets can’t tell us if we’re pushing too hard. Pay attention to your dogs’ noises and reactions to your touch, you should get a sense (or a nip!) if they’re not enjoying their massage. Alternately, your dog may also give you obvious signs that they are enjoying their massage. They might roll on their back and offer their tummy to you as the next massaging location.

Massaging can be therapeutic for your furry pal-especially for old dogs. Just like their human counterparts, dogs become delicate as they get older. Their bones and joints get sore and simple journeys up and down the stairs can tire them out. Be extra careful when massaging older pets, as their muscles can be tenderer than a younger dog’s, and massaging too hard can cause your elderly pup pain rather than relief.

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A massage can be a relaxing and enjoyable experience for both you and your pet. It gives you some time to bond as well as relieves any of those doggy stresses and aches and pains. If your dog has a previous injury or appears unwell or particularly sore, only attempt a massage after a veterinarian has inspected your pooch and made sure he or she is in tip-top shape.

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Have you given your dog a massage? How'd it go?

18 May 2017 By Kat Pekin Comments

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