Pointer

Pointers are even-tempered doggies that have an agile and sporty-looking appearance. Boasting graceful curves, Pointers are muscular dogs, covering the ground smoothly and at high speed, with a driving hind action. Their coats are smooth, straight and short with a glossy sheen. Pointers carry their heads nobly and proudly. Their most distinguishing features are the slight concavity on top of their muzzles which gives their noses a tip-tilted appearance and the typical pointer stance with tail and foreleg raised and head extended —ready for hunting!

Despite their size, Pointers can be good house pets but be warned—they will need adequate exercise to satisfy their high energy levels.

Other Names
English Pointer
Country of Origin
England
Colour
Pointers come in lemon and white, orange and white, liver and white and black and white. Self colours and tricolours are also seen.
Size
Large
Height / Weight
Bitches measure 61 to 66cms at the withers and weigh around 26kgs. Male Pointers measure 63 to 69cms and tend to weigh around 30kgs.
Health
Inherited problems include: Hip screening of the parents is a must if you can, as is regular inspection of the coat to ensure any skin problems are dealt with before they develop. Self-inflicted injuries usually happen between 3-9 months, possibly caused by the onset of degeneration of the spinal cord. Eye problems and hernias are relatively infrequent in Pointers, but common ailments to keep a look out for include: Hip dysplasia Degeneration of the Spinal Cord Entropy Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) Gout Neurotoxin Osteopathy Ruptures/Hernias - Umbilical hernia Mange
Life Span
13 -14 years
Intelligence
Pointers are intelligent and therefore learn reasonably quickly. Because of their sensitive natures, training should be done with kindness and rewards. They do not like to be dominated.
Exercise
High
Suitability (Children)
Medium
Feeding

As active as Pointers are, they do need a diet that aids this. A high-protein, high-calorie diet is best in order to support their activity needs.

Feeding Cost
$15-$20 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
Primarily field sports dogs, Pointers are bouncing with energy so they need plenty of exercise. After puppyhood, a big yard to move in or the opportunity for free galloping is a necessity on a regular basis. Pointers would be excellent pets for runners or bike riders as they will happily gallop alongside you. Careful when letting them off the lead—they are hunting dogs and, as such, will gallop off on their own. Of all the commands dogs need to know, 'come' is your top priority with a Pointer.
Ailments
Inherited problems include: Hip screening of the parents is a must if you can, as is regular inspection of the coat to ensure any skin problems are dealt with before they develop. Self-inflicted injuries usually happen between 3-9 months, possibly caused by the onset of degeneration of the spinal cord. Eye problems and hernias are relatively infrequent in Pointers, but common ailments to keep a look out for include: Hip dysplasia Degeneration of the Spinal Cord Entropy Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) Gout Neurotoxin Osteopathy Ruptures/Hernias - Umbilical hernia Mange
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

Pointers are one of the absolute easiest breeds to groom, only needing a brush over during the moulting seasons. However regular inspection of the coat should be made to check for potential skin problems.

Grooming Frequency
Up to once a week
Trimming
None
Where exactly the Pointer came from is not entirely clear: whether they originate from Spanish Pointers or from Continental Pointers, we don't know. What IS certain is that English Pointers date back to the 1600s, and are a native breed to the British Isles. As per their name, they were used to "point" game out to hunters. These early dogs worked with Greyhounds in hare-coursing, the Pointers being used to point out hares for the Greyhounds to seize. In the early 1700s, wing shooting came into fashion and this was when they REALLY came into their own. To this day, Pointers make exceptional hunting dogs.


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