Parson Russell Terrier

Formerly known as the Jack Russell Terrier, the Parson Russell Terrier has since been classified as its very own distinct breed.

Parsons are relatively small, active and lively 'pawsome' pals, and mainly white in colour with some other coloured markings being common.

Originally used with foxhounds to go to ground after foxes they are small enough to burrow into a fox's lair, and quick and little independent problem solvers. They have long legs, which were ideal for keeping up with the horses; but their body is shaped to allow them to be able to get into small spaces - so you might want to make sure the base of your properties fences are secure.

Other Names
Parson, PRT
Country of Origin
Great Britain
Colour
Mainly white in colour with tan, lemon or black markings. These markings are normally seen on the head or tail.
Size
Small
Height / Weight
Males measure 36cms at the withers; weigh 5-8kgs. Bitches measure apx 33cms; weigh 5-8kgs.
Health
Common ailments include hereditary cataracts or a luxated lens. Some are also prone to dislocation of the kneecaps, deafness, or Legg Perthes—a disease of the hip joints of small breeds of dogs.
Life Span
14-15 years
Intelligence
The Parson is an intelligent little dog but can be a bit stubborn - a common trait in most terriers. Training is relatively easy but owners need to be consistent and firm. They do have a tendency to turn a deaf ear when on the scent of something and so it's very important for their safety when out and about with you that they are trained to return to you on command. They can be quite dominant over other dogs, particularly other terriers, so should be properly socialised and trained as puppies.
Exercise
Medium
Suitability (Children)
Medium
Feeding

As a breed the Parson Russell Terrier is easy to please, they aren't fussy eaters.

Feeding Cost
$5-$10 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
The Parson Russell Terrier is a fun-loving, fabulous companion when sufficiently exercised; if it does not get enough, it can become a nuisance. They like nothing better than a long walk where they can get off the lead and can pick up a scent and are at home with a big backyard.
Ailments
Common ailments include hereditary cataracts or a luxated lens. Some are also prone to dislocation of the kneecaps, deafness, or Legg Perthes—a disease of the hip joints of small breeds of dogs.
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

The Parson Russell can be rough or smooth coated; but both 'pawfect' pals have a dense double coat. The rough coated Parson requires hand stripping, at least twice a year.

The smooth coated Parson is much easier to groom; a rubber-grooming mitt will remove the dead and shedding hairs. Both types of coat should be brushed weekly.

Grooming Frequency
Once a week
Trimming
None
The Parson Russell was developed and established in the 18th Century in Devon by Reverend John Russell. John Russell was born into a fox hunting family in 1795, and he wanted a dog that could keep up with the horses, run with the foxhounds and was small enough to flush the foxes from their dens. While studying at Oxford he saw, and bought, the perfect dog for his purposes, and it's thought that this was the very first dog to be known as a Jack Russell. During his time as a clergyman, John Russell devoted himself to both the church and breeding terriers suitable for fox hunting. Russell bred Parsons to be independent problem solvers, and to this day the breed can have their own ideas about how to go about things.


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