Japanese Chin

This little spaniel has a BIG heart. The high-set tail arches over the back and will wag wildly when it greets you at the door. The Chin has a broad head, large wide-set eyes, and a short broad muzzle. Feathered, soft hair covers its body making it silky to touch. The nose is wide with an extremely short nasal canal. Underneath all that hair, the Chin is a compact dog whose height and length are usually the same size. The Japanese Chin is a delightful little fluff ball.

Other Names
Chin, Japanese Spaniel
Country of Origin
Japan
Colour
The coat is white with coloured patches. The patches are often black, but can also be red, lemon, orange, sable, black and white with tan points, or brindle.
Size
Small
Height / Weight
The dog stands at 24 - 28cms and the bitch at 18 - 24cms. Their weight depends on the size and build of the dog or bitch but is normally around 2 - 7kgs.
Health
Like many short-faced breeds, the Japanese Chin tends to wheeze and snore. They are prone to eye and respiratory problems and heat prostration.
Life Span
8-10 years
Intelligence
Chins are smart cookies and can be taught to perform tricks. However, be firm when training and determine that you are the "pack leader", otherwise this little dog can get a BIG ego.
Exercise
Low
Suitability (Children)
Low
Feeding

If you're feeding a Japanese Chin you have to be delicate. Their high metabolism means that their food should be spread between two to three small meals a day rather than one big one. They are fond of dry and tinned food and love crunching up hard biscuits (which is perfect for their dental program).

Feeding Cost
Up to $5 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
Like all dogs, Chins need their daily walk, however they are perfectly satisfied with just a short trip around the block. They will relish to playing in an open yard for short periods of time.
Ailments
Like many short-faced breeds, the Japanese Chin tends to wheeze and snore. They are prone to eye and respiratory problems and heat prostration.
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

A few minutes each day will keep the Chin's coat looking beautiful. Comb out tangles and brush lightly and upwards, giving the hair a bit more volume to achieve that feathered look. Ears and eyes should be cleaned every day to spot signs of infection.

Grooming Frequency
Daily
Trimming
Moderate
You may be surprised to learn that the Japanese Chin is not from Japan (the name is misleading, we know). They are actually native to China! However, Chins were later developed in Japan and introduced to Europe in 1700. They became a favourite of Japanese nobility, and were often offered as royal gifts to diplomats and foreigners awarded for outstanding service to Japan. In 1853, a pair were given as a gift to Queen Victoria from Commodore Perry when he returned from his historic mission to open Japan to world trade. The Japanese Chin is first and foremost a companion dog.


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