Harrier Hound

Speed, smell and energy are the holy trinity of the Harrier Hound. A hardy hunting hound with a strong jaw that levels a pretty mean bite to its prey (assuming you're hoping to go hunting with your hunting dog). The Harrier Hound is a solid dog, its large bones and muscular body means that it's built for strength and stamina. If you look closely, you'll notice that the Harrier Hound is actually slightly longer than it is tall, adding to the appearance of strength. Their tails are medium in length and carried high, making them ideal for wagging when they welcome you home. The Harrier Hound usually has brown or hazel, a broad head with a strong square muzzle, and a wide black nose.

Country of Origin
England
Colour
Comes in a variety of colours. Take your pick from lemon-yellow & white, red & white, or white & tan. Occasionally the colouring on their back is completely black.
Size
Large
Height / Weight
Ideally dogs measure between 48 - 53cms at the withers and weigh around 22 - 27kgs. Bitches measure between 44 - 48cms at the withers and weigh around 18 - 23kgs.
Health
The Harrier Hound is generally a healthy breed with no serious genetic defects. Can be prone to Hip dysplasia. Due to the Harrier Hounds having deep chests they can also be prone to bloat. Epilepsy is also occasionally found in Harrier Hounds.
Life Span
10-12 years
Intelligence
Intelligent and energetic, Harrier Hounds require frequent and consist training and exercise. The physical and mental workout is important for them because it prevents separation anxiety. They do have a tendency to get a bit carried away when following a scent so it's best to use a lead when taking them for a walk.
Exercise
High
Suitability (Children)
Low
Feeding

Harrier Hounds are not picky eaters and as a result can quickly resemble something off Weight Watchers. It's not really their fault, their deep chests mean they're prone to bloating so it's best to only feed them dry food once or twice a day.

Feeding Cost
$15-$20 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
The Harrier is a pleasant companion when sufficiently exercised, however can be a bit of a nuisance when they don't get their full quota of outdoor play. Their energetic nature makes them excellent jogging companions.
Ailments
The Harrier Hound is generally a healthy breed with no serious genetic defects. Can be prone to Hip dysplasia. Due to the Harrier Hounds having deep chests they can also be prone to bloat. Epilepsy is also occasionally found in Harrier Hounds.
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

Their short-haired coat only needs a few sessions with a firm bristle brush before the coat is clean. Harrier Hounds should be bathed once every two weeks in the warmer months and once a month in the colder months.

Grooming Frequency
Once a week
Trimming
Moderate
There are a lot of conflicting stories about Harrier Hound came to be. Some believe that they are the eventual result of crossing of Bloodhounds, Talbot Hounds and even Basset Hounds. Others believe the breed was developed by crossing English Foxhounds with Fox Terriers and Greyhounds. Today’s Harrier Hound is sized between the Beagle and English Foxhound and is mainly used to hunt hare and in the UK (the most English of past times). The Harrier is still fairly unusual in Australia, but has a long history of being used as working dogs in England.


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