Greyhound

With the athletic and grace of a fine racehorse, the Greyhound is certainly the sports star of the canine world. Tall and slender, the Greyhound is built for speed and explosive power through their muscular hind legs. The Greyhound is a symmetrical beast, it has long legs and moves in low and free strides. Despite their power their face is sensitive and emotive, with a long muzzle and deep brown eyes. 

Country of Origin
Great Britain/Egypt
Colour
Solid black, white, red, blue, fawn, fallow or brindle or a mix of any of the colours with white.
Size
Large
Height / Weight
Bitches measure between 68 to 71cms at the withers, weighing 27 to 30kgs, dogs between 71 to 76cms,weighing between 30 to 32kgs.
Health
The Greyhound has some health issues related to their impressive athletic abilities. They can be highly prone to leg injuries and also tend to be highly sensitive to drugs like sedatives. If you adopt a Greyhound who has been a racer in a past life you will need to take special care of their teeth as they can be neglected. Bleeding disorders are also common in Greyhounds.
Life Span
10-12 years
Intelligence
Greyhounds are fairly easy to train and can learn almost all commands. They can, however, choose to totally ignore you if they have their eyes set on a prey!
Exercise
Low
Suitability (Children)
Medium
Feeding

Despite their athleticism the Greyhound is not a big eater and will not cost much to feed.

Feeding Cost
Up to $20 p/w
Other Cost
Frequent leg injuries can mean extra vet bills
Excercise
Greyhounds are seen as the sportsman of the canine world but in reality they don't require too much exercise. Built to be sprinters, the Greyhound has a low level of endurance and will be satisfied with two short walks a day. You should not let your Greyhound off their lead in public in case their hunting instinct takes over. For the same reason you will need to make sure you have a high fence as the Greyhound has a huge jump and will be inclined to chase anything that moves! Once your Greyhound takes off, unless you are a master sprinter you probably won't be able to catch them.
Ailments
The Greyhound has some health issues related to their impressive athletic abilities. They can be highly prone to leg injuries and also tend to be highly sensitive to drugs like sedatives. If you adopt a Greyhound who has been a racer in a past life you will need to take special care of their teeth as they can be neglected. Bleeding disorders are also common in Greyhounds.
Hair Shed
Little
Grooming

The Greyhound has very low maintenance grooming requirements, an occasional brush over will be enough for their short coats.

Grooming Frequency
Up to once a week
Trimming
None
The Greyhound has been viewed as a God by many cultures with Egyptian, Asian and African leaders being seen in their tombs from as far back as 4000 BC. The Greyhound was originally used to course large game like deer and antelope but soon became a fashion symbol in Britain and Europe. In 1016 the Greyhound was so popular that soon a law was passed to allow only the elite to own one. The Greyhound was even seen on the coats of arms of both Charles V of France and Henry VIII of England. This noble breed was soon being used purely for the sport of coursing hares, and then when track race arrived they soon became the stars! They are second only to the Cheetah in speed, and are the fastest dogs of the animal world.


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