Dobermann Pinscher

The Dobermann Pinscher is a large and powerful beast that carries itself with an air of grace and elegance. They have a smooth, short coat and can come in various colours though most have tan markings. The Dobermann Pinscher is built for speed and endurance, a little like a racing horse, and their square body allows them a propulsive powerful drive through their hind legs. They have a vigorous but balanced gait with broad strides.

Other Names
Doberman Pinscher, Dobie, Devil Dog
Country of Origin
Germany
Colour
Brown, black, blue or fawn (also known as Isabella) but all will come with tan markings.
Size
Large
Height / Weight
Dogs measure between 68 to 72cms at the withers and bitches measure between 63 to 68cms. Dobermanns should weigh between 32 to 45kgs.
Health
There are some genetic disorders that can affect the Dobermann Pinscher, especially later in life. This includes Von Willebrand's Disease. Dobermans can also be prone to bleeding disorders, including Dilated Cardiomyopathy. They can also be affected by Wobbler's Syndrome, Chronic Active Hepatitis can also be more common in female dogs. A young and developing dog may have Bone or hip-dysplasia issues if over exercised.
Life Span
10-12 years
Intelligence
The Dobermann Pinscher is an intelligent dog that desires to plead their pack leader. They need to know who the boss is and though they will bond with the family they tend to attach to one person in particular.
Exercise
High
Suitability (Children)
Low
Feeding

A large and athletic dog the Dobermann Pinscher can be done to bloating and should not be fed within an hour of exercising. Puppies will require a highly nutritious diet for at least the first few years as they grow and develop rapidly. Two meals per day is preferable to ensure your Dobie has adequate energy over the day.

Feeding Cost
$15-$20 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
The Dobermann Pinscher is an active breed and will enjoy swimming, running off the lead at the park, and is happy to run beside you as you jog or cycle. An under-excerised Dobie can become destructive so you will have to put in the time to make sure they are kept active.
Ailments
There are some genetic disorders that can affect the Dobermann Pinscher, especially later in life. This includes Von Willebrand's Disease. Dobermans can also be prone to bleeding disorders, including Dilated Cardiomyopathy. They can also be affected by Wobbler's Syndrome, Chronic Active Hepatitis can also be more common in female dogs. A young and developing dog may have Bone or hip-dysplasia issues if over exercised.
Hair Shed
Moderate
Grooming

Dobermann Pinscher's require very little grooming. A good rub down with a grooming kit to remove dead skin and hair should be all they need.

Grooming Frequency
Once a week
Trimming
None
The Dobermann Pinscher was created by Herr Louis Dobermann in Germany in the ltd 19th Century. He is believed to have used a Great Dane, a Rottweiler, Greyhounds and Machester Terriers to combine their size, strength, speed, tenacity and sleek coat and graceful figure. The Dobie's may also have a little of other German breeds like Schnauser, Pinscher, German Shephers, Shorthaired Pointers and Weimaraners. Herr Louis wanted a dog that could protect and accompany him as he worked as a night watchman, tax collector and dog catcher. He spent almost 60 years of his life in the town of Apolda in South Central Germany to design his perfect protection dog, finally registered in the German studbook in 1893. After he died Otto Goeller and Philip Gruening took up the breed. After the First World War the breed suffered and there were few left, people couldn't afford to retain them and some were even eaten. Luckily for the Dobie, American servicemen were fond of them, taking them to USA and forming the U.S. Doberman club in 1921, breeding from the original lines. Originally the Dobermann was called as a terrier, like the Manchester Terrier (back then they were a lot bigger then the breed we know today). Dobermann were still popular with servicemen in the second World War and US marines used them to help flush out the enemy when they came ashore. Their exploits in battle earned them the nickname 'Devil Dog' and they are still seen as intimidating dogs even today. After WWII the Dobie also became known in England, the Curnows, a couple who ran a kennel called 'Tavey' took up the cause and in 1948 formed both the Dobermann club and a breeding program, beginning with European stock but later going back to the American Dobies for their larger size and elegance.


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