Belgian Shepherd — Groenendael

As the most popular of the Belgian shepherds, the Groenendael is similar to a long-haired German Shepherd in appearance although its had a squarer profile with a more delicate frame. This breed loves to be included in the family and can develop behavioural issues if it feels isolated. As a dominant breed, they are not recommended for novice owners.

 

 

 

Other Names
Chien de Berger Belge, Belgian Shepherd, Belgian Sheepdog
Country of Origin
Belgium
Colour
Although predominantly black in colour, the Groenendael may feature white markings on their chest and feet.
Size
Large
Height / Weight
The Groenendael typically measures from 56 – 66cms and weighs 27 – 29kgs.
Health
Prospective parents should ask for certification to ensure the puppy's parents are both eye tested and hip-scored. Epilepsy and skin conditions are also a risk in this breed.
Life Span
12-14 years
Intelligence
This intelligent breed requires a gently yet persistent training method and if willing to learn and socialised from a young age, are quick to pick up on any cues.
Exercise
High
Suitability (Children)
Low
Feeding

With a generally good appetite, this breed can be fed a typical diet.

 

Feeding Cost
$15-$20 p/w
Other Cost
Excercise
They need plenty of exercise and mental stimulation and to this end they excel at agility and obedience. They are very active dogs and should not be considered as pets if they are to be left alone all day.
Ailments
Prospective parents should ask for certification to ensure the puppy's parents are both eye tested and hip-scored. Epilepsy and skin conditions are also a risk in this breed.
Hair Shed
Moderate
Grooming

The Groenendael needs regular grooming throughout the week to maintain their dense undercoat and long, thick outercoat.

 

Grooming Frequency
More than once a week
Trimming
None
The Belgian Shepherd dog is the only known breed that features four separate varieties. Named after the areas of Belgium in which they were bred, the different dogs are as follows: The black long haired Groenendael, the fawn, red or grey long haired Tervueren, the fawn, red or grey short coated Malinois and the reddish fawn rough coated Laekenois. Although known separately, the main difference between these breeds is their coat. The black Groenendael was developed as a result of crossing a Belgian sheepdog with a black herding dog. The name Groenendael was chosen in 1910, with the breed recognised by the American Kennel Club in 1912.


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